Malaga

Unexpected Malaga

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Discover Malaga’s history


Aerial view of Malaga with Port from castle in evening

Aerial view of Malaga with Port from castle in evening

Cathedral (Catedral La Manquita) and bell tower, Malaga

Cathedral (Catedral La Manquita) and bell tower, Malaga

Malaga, Spain

Malaga, Spain

Roman amphitheatre ruin in Malaga

Roman amphitheatre ruin in Malaga

The famous Alcazar of Segovia

The famous Alcazar of Segovia

View of Malaga with bullring and harbor

View of Malaga with bullring and harbor

Malaga beach

Malaga beach

ROL Cruise recommends...


1. Visit the One-Armed Lady 

Locals have nicknamed Malaga’s stunning Renaissance cathedral ‘La Manquita’ (one-armed lady) because its south tower was never fully built. Legend says the money intended for the cathedral’s completion was donated to the British colonies fighting for their independence in the American Revolution – but despite opportunities to complete the build, Malaga’s people decided to keep their much-loved city symbol the way it is.


2. Trace Picasso’s early life 

Art lovers flock to the Picasso Museum in Malaga, where over two hundred of the artist’s works are displayed – many of which have been donated by Picasso’s surviving family members. Within the historic Plaza de la Merced is ‘Casa Natal’, otherwise known as The Birthplace Museum, where a young Picasso was born and raised. The building has been an official heritage site since 1983 and visitors can see artefacts from Picasso’s home and cultural life.


3. Step back in time at Malaga’s central market

Malaga’s central Atarazanas market is a fantastic example of nineteenth century Spanish architecture, despite being set inside a building which used to be a naval shipyard back in the fourteenth century. Now, stallholders noisily fill the space each day with their produce, ranging from fresh fish and swinging legs of ham to exotic fruits and colourful vegetables, all of which entice both tourists and locals alike.


4. Explore Malaga’s medieval buildings

The medieval Alcazaba is a Moorish fortress built in the eleventh century and is one of the best preserved fortresses in the country, with maintained gardens, fountains and quaint courtyards. Nearby, a walk along an ancient wall takes you to Gibralfaro Castle, where you can enjoy unobstructed views across the city. Close to the entrance there’s also the remains of a Roman Theatre first built by Emperor Augustus in the first century AD - only unearthed by accident in the 1950s!

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